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20130218
20130218
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like thank you. tavis: please welcome laura dern by on this program. the oscar nominees is enjoying great success on her series called "enlightened." here is a scene from "enlightened." >> where have you been for two days a? >> i was in lna. >> and? >> i do not want to talk to you about this kind of stuff. it would be great if you were happy for me, but it never works out that way. >> happy for what now? >> things are going to change for the better, so when the time is right. >> you have a new boyfriend or what? >> it is more than that. the bigger liar if i dream about. the happy, mom. that is all i need from you. tavis: all right, then. how cool is that? >> it was cool getting to work with my mom. tavis: it really is mom. since you were last year a few things have happened. you actually won a golden globe for the series. >> which is so amazing. i will say the foreign press and the critics and you, there were so many champions of the show, which was huge for us to find our following and get to the second season. it is a half-hour co
a weeklong focus on guns here on pbs, "after newtown." on the newshour this evening, we look at political and other developments since the december tragedy and zero in on the gun debate in colorado. >> in the divisive atmosphere of the gun debate, both sides, at the federal and state level, say they know the coming months won't be easy. but they will be critical. >> ifill: then, we take up the arguments for and against the proposed construction of the keystone pipeline, as environmental activists mounted a protest this weekend. >> woodurff: ray suarez updates the hugo chavez story, after the president's surprise return to venezuela following more than two months of cancer treatment in cuba. >> ifill: and jeffrey brown talks with filmmaker kirby dick about his oscar-nominated documentary "the invisible war," detailing the high rate of sexual assault in the u.s. military. >> 86% of men and women who are sexually assaulted in the military don't report. they experience reprisals that are, in many ways, a second betrayal that's even worse than the actual rape itself. >> ifill: that's all ahead
>> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. after aurora, after virginia tech, after columbine, the question of gun violence becomes a recurring national conversation. this evening, newshour joins pbs in a week of special coverage on the topic of gun violence: "after newtown." the waves of reaction since december's connecticut school shooting continue to reverberate from coast to coast. >> now! ifill: as gun-control activists push for stricter laws. and gun owners chafe against the prospect of new regulation, crossing for... causing for now an increase in sale in firearms and attendance at gun shows. that dpebt is now spre
and facebook and watch us anytime on the pbs app for iphones and ipads. there's much more on our website. you can comment on all of our stories and share them. audio and video podcasts are also available. join us at pbs.org. as we leave you, scenes of ash wednesday at the vatican, where pope benedict xvi celebrated what is expected to have been his last public mass as pope. ♪ ♪ ♪ . >> announcer: major funding is provided by the lily endowment, an indianapolis-based private family foundation dedicated to its founders' interest in religion, community development and education. additional funding also provided by mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. and the co
woodruff. tonight begins a weeklong focus on guns here on pbs, "after newtown." on the newshour this evening, we look at political and other developments since the december tragedy and zero in on the gun debate in colorado. >> in the divisive atmosphere of the gun debate, both sides, at the federal and state level, say they know the coming months won't be easy. but they will be critical. >> ifill: then, we take up the arguments for and against the proposed construction of the keystone pipeline, as environmental activists mounted a protest this weekend. >> woodurff: ray suarez updates the hugo chavez story, after the president's surprise return to venezuela following more than two months of cancer treatment in cuba. >> ifill: and jeffrey brown talks with filmmaker kirby dick about his oscar-nominated documentary "the invisible war," detailing the high rate of sexual assault in the u.s. military. >> 86% of men and women who are sexually assaulted in the military don't report. they experience reprisals that are, in many ways, a second betrayal that's even worse than the actual rape
on "downton abbey," which concludes its third season later tonight on pbs. she has won two oscars, three emmys, and a tony award, all wrapped around a long and illustrious career on the british stage. at age 78, she is at the peak of her fame, much in demand, and quite bankable. last spring's "the best exotic marigold hotel" was a surprise hit, and there is a new film out, "quartet," directed by dustin hoffman. she doesn't have much time or interest in giving interviews, which she's compared to testifying in court. they're a rarity. we were fortunate enough to get one. you seem to have no interest in celebrity and fame. >> maggie smith: absolutely none. i mean, why would i? >> kroft: do you accept the fact that you're a star? >> smith: if you say so. yes. i do... i don't feel any different to the way i felt before, and i'm not quite sure what it means. i am familiar to people now, which is what i was not before. that is entirely due to the television set. >> kroft: she's talking about "downton abbey," the highbrow british soap opera that follows the intrigues of an aristocratic family and thei
as the dowager countess on "downton abbey," which concludes its third season later tonight on pbs. she has won two oscars, three emmys, and a tony award, all wrapped around a long and illustrious career on the british stage. at age 78, she is at the peak of her fame, much in demand, and quite bankable. last spring's "the best exotic marigold hotel" was a surprise hit, and there is a new film out, "quartet," directed by dustin hoffman. she doesn't have much time or interest in giving interviews, which she's compared to testifying in court. they're a rarity. we were fortunate enough to get one. you seem to have no interest in celebrity and fame. >> maggie smith: absolutely none. i mean, why would i? >> kroft: do you accept the fact that you're a star? >> smith: if you say so. yes. i do... i don't feel any different to the way i felt before, and i'm not quite sure what it means. i am familiar to people now, which is what i was not before. that is entirely due to the television set. >> kroft: she's talking about "downton abbey," the highbrow british soap opera that follows the intrigues of an aris
old. >>> we're learning more about the troubled background of adam lanza. a new investigation by pbs finds that lanza was diagnosed with a sensory disorder, was very shy and liked being touched only by his mother. as for the exposure to guns, friends say lanza's mother nancy loved shooting because it helped her bond with her son. >> extraordinary reporting. this is kind of one of the summary graphs of the story, what emerges in this exploration of a still unfolding story is a portrait of a mother apparently devoted but perhaps misguided, struggling is to find her son a place in society. and a boy exceptionally smart in some areas, profoundly deficient in others, who never found a place in the world. >> it's just so sad because of the outcome of this. you think when you look at what happened in their life, you think if she had just made a different decision somewhere along the way, this could have been avoided. and everybody points to the guns, and that being the wrong decision that she made. but perhaps it's not the guns. maybe it's the type of help she got for her son and it wasn't
and of course i'll have the weekend. >> what is the weekend? (laughter) >> that was a clip from pbs's "downton abbey." british tv series that depicts the lives of an n aristocratic family and their servants and almost as popular as american idol is here and abroad. despite the fact that it makes rich people look good and not evil, stu varney says that's the opposite message of the one we have been getting from some of our elected leaders here at home. stu varney host of varney and company at the fox business network. you see a political message here and you're not the only one. many on the left particularly in great britain have been ripping the show suggesting the creator julian fellow hes is in their view conservative and to the right and more fair-minded people say he's a center right, not far right, but in any event they say -- they accused him of having an agenda of making the rich look good and that's why they hate "downton abbey" and you say what. >> what other tv show have you ever seen, a modern tv show, where the rich are made to look generous, honest, classy, and looking after peopl
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)